Wet Rot

 

Wood Rots

 

Dry rot and wet rot are fungi that attack timber to feed on, they destroy the cellulose and lignin of the wood

resulting in the weakening of the timber. The structural integrity of timber can be severely affected if left

unchecked in such cases, timber replacement may be required.

Call Us: 0208 535 7536
   
 

 

Wood rots can affect old and modern buildings alike, they will thrive in moist, damp

environments especially where poor ventilation is present. The attacking rots are made

up of the vegetative fibrous mycelium and the fleshy fruiting body. A Garratt’s Damp &

Timber Ltd datasheet on Identification of Wood Rot in the Home pdf covers this a little

more detail.

   
 

   ●  Dry Rot is a single species and is classed a brown rot.

 

   ●  Wet Rot is a group of many species of wood rots that can be sub divided into brown rots and

       white rots.

 
 

 

Wet Rots

 

The two types of wet rot, brown and white can both be destructive to timber, they have a different affect upon

the wood depending upon type. Generally brown rots cause cuboidal cracking & shrinkage of the timber whilst

white rots tend to reduce the timber to a stringy, fibrous texture. The differences and affects of each type are

outlined in the following sections.

 

Brown Wet Rots

 

 
 

The most common wet rot we find in the home is Coniophora Puteana (as shown) this

brown variety commonly known as Cellar Fungus.

 

The mycelium (vegetative part of the fungus) where present, exhibits a dark brown-

lack, sheet like growth with delicate brown threads sprouting from the rotting wood,

white sheets of mycelium may be observed with this species during the early stages of

an attack.

 

   
         
 

The fruiting body of cellar fungus is rarely seen but when present will be brown, with a slightly lumpy texture,

the growth will have cream coloured margins.

 
 

 

The mycelium may show a limited amount of growth over adjacent masonry. The brown,

often fan like threads associated with cellar fungus can be seen growing in such an

environment in the picture on the right.

Spores of wet rot germinate in the pores of the timber, the resulting mycelium feeds

upon the cellulose of the timber, it spreads out and eventually produces a fruiting body.

   
Spores released from the fruiting body will lodge in the pores of the timber repeating the destructive cycle.

 

The structure of the timber is seriously affected by the rot feeding upon the cellulose.

The wood will shrink and crack, become brittle and take on a darker colour, these signs

will also appear with dry rot attack.

     
 

The shrinking of the timber will create cube like sections as shown, the depth of cracking

is generally less with wet rots than with dry rot. This condition seriously undermines the

structural integrity of the timber. The attack of such rots requires action if outbreaks are

to be controlled.

   
 

The other most frequently found brown wet rot in the home is Fibroporia Vaillini aka Mine Fungus, some details

of this are shown on our  Identification of Wood Rot in the Home pdf.

 
 

White Wet Rots;

 

The most common white, wet rot we find in the home is Phellinus Contiguus (as shown) sadly this white variety

of wet rot has no common name.

 
 

The mycelium (vegetative part of the fungus) where present, exhibits a light brown,

sheet like growth. Bunches of light brown threads may be observed sprouting from the

rotting wood. The fruiting body of P.Contiguus is brown, with lots of small pores and it

has a woody nature, it often hugs the contours of the host timber and may have a

slightly corrugated appearance. The mycelium may also attack external masonry.

   
 

Spores of wet rot germinate in the pores of the timber, the resulting mycelium feeds upon the cellulose of the

timber, it spreads out and eventually produces a fruiting body. Spores released from the fruiting body will lodge

in the pores of the timber repeating the destructive cycle.

 
 

The structure of the timber is seriously affected by the rot feeding upon the cellulose and

lignin. The wood break down exhibiting a coarse, fibrous appearance with a lighening in

colour. This condition undermines the structural integrity of the timber. The attack of

such rots requires action if outbreaks are to be controlled.
The other most frequently found white wet rots include Donkioporia.Expansa,

Asterostroma Spp and Pleurotus Ostreatus, better known as Oyster Fungus. Some

further details of these are found on our  Identification of Wood Rot in the Home pdf.

   
 

The Cause

 

The general cause of wet rot growth is a high moisture content within timber for the fungus to establish. Typical

causes are gutter leaks, roofing defects, plumbing leaks etc. Damp, poorly ventilated environments are

susceptible to outbreaks of wet rot.

 

 

The Solution

 

The primary solution is to control the environment that is allowing the growth of wet rot. The cause of

dampness needs to be identified and fixed, this can be due to penetrating dampness, or occasionally poorly

ventilated areas suffering from condensation. All these causes are specialist areas that Garratt’s Damp &

Timber encounter and resolve on a regular basis.

The removal of any wet rot from timbers and masonry is essential, seriously affected timbers will need

replacement and areas of masonry and retained timbers will require irrigation and sterilizing.

 

Garratt’s Damp & Timber offer Free Surveys & Reports for all aspects of damp and timber defects within the

home, we are just a phone call away.

 

 

Garratt’s Damp & Timber Ltd.

0208-535-7536

your solution begins here…


Copyright ©2008 www.dampproofing-london.co.uk All Rights Reserved

 

 
             

 

 

Home  |  Contact  |  Book Survey  | 

  | Damp Overview  |  Timber Treatments  |  Wet Rot  |  Woodworm  |  Basement Tanking  |  Condensation  |  Dry Rot  |  Penetrating Damp  |  Rising Damp  |

Copyright: Garratts Ltd 2010 Website designed by: npwebservices.co.uk